School Accountability Report Card    
  Reported for School Year 2004-05  

Published During 2005-06

 

Notes regarding the source and currency of data:
Data included in this School Accountability Report Card (SARC) template are consistent with State Board of Education guidelines, which are available at the California Department of Education Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/definitions05.asp

Most data presented in this report were collected from the 2004-05 school year or from the two preceding years (2002-03 and 2003-04). Due to the certification timelines for graduation, dropout, and fiscal information, the data for these sections of the report were collected in 2003-04. Single-year column headings refer to the school year ending in that particular year. When no year is specified, data are from the most recent school year for which data are available.

More information about SARC requirements is available at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/, including a SARC Preparation Guide at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/guide.asp and Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/questions.asp.


I. General Information

Contact Information
Information about school and district contacts.

School Information

District Information

 School Name

 West (Merrill F.) High

 District Name

 Tracy Joint Unified

 Principal

 Herman Calad

 Superintendent

 Dr. James C. Franco

 Street

 1775 W. Lowell Ave.

 Street

 1875 W. Lowell Ave.

 City, State, Zip

 Tracy, CA    95376-4017

 City, State, Zip

 Tracy, CA    95376-4095

 Phone Number

 (209) 831-5430

 Phone Number

 (209) 830-3200

 FAX Number

 (209) 831-5405

 FAX Number

 (209) 830-3204

 Web Site

 www.tracy.k12.ca.us/whs

 Web Site

 www.tracy.k12.ca.us

 E-mail Address

 hcalad@tusd.net

 E-mail Address

 jwakefield@tusd.net

 CDS Code

 39-75499-3930302

 SARC Contact

 Jessica Wakefield


School Description and Mission Statement
Information about the school, its programs, and its goals.

Merrill F. West High School is a four-year comprehensive high school situated on fifty acres in west Tracy.  West opened in 1993 to meet the needs of a growing community, which provides affordable housing for an influx of Bay Area commuters.  In 2004-05, the school housed approximately 2,919 students, of which the five largest ethnic populations consisted of: White (38%); Hispanic (31%); Asian (11%); African American (10%) and Filipino (8%).  West High’s vision and mission statement focus on students becoming successful life-long learners and responsible citizens in an ever-changing society.  The vision was updated in the spring of 2004 when the school engaged in a Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) self-study process.  Previously, the school received a six-year WASC accreditation with a three-year review.  For 2004-05, West High received a two year accreditation.  In 2003 West High School was eligible for the Governor’s Performance Award and the school was named as a California Distinguished School.  West High offers traditional college prep curriculum and three outstanding programs: the Space and Engineering Academy, The Institute for Global Commerce (IGCG) and the Advanced Placement program.  The Space and Engineering Academy, aside from being a former Specialized Secondary Program, was a past recipient of the Golden Bell Award for special programs from the California School Boards Association.  In 2003, our outstanding Art Program was a recipient of the Exemplary Art Program Award, awarded by the California Art Education Association.  The IGCG was opened three years ago as a magnet satellite school with a focus on international business and government.  The Advanced Placement program attained a passing rate of 53% on all exams taken.  .  The school is also a high-tech Digital High School.  West High School is on the cutting edge of educational technology.  Student activities are abundant with numerous student clubs and interscholastic sports.  The athletic programs competed in the San Joaquin Athletic Association and were highly competitive in boys and girls athletics.  A female track athlete, Brittany Daniels, was the CIF State Champion in the triple jump and long jump.  The girls track team won the state championship in track.


Opportunities for Parental Involvement
Information about the contact person for parental involvement and a description of organized opportunities for parental involvement at the school.

 Contact Person Name 

 Audrey Harrison

 School Secretary

 Contact Person Phone Number 

 (209) 831-5463

The school offers a wide variety of parent involvement options: the principal holds regular Principal Forums; a parents group works to fund-raise for a senior graduation Safe and Sober Cruise; the Home Field Advantage organization engages in fund-raisers to support athletics; and a variety of other parent booster clubs exist as well as the School Site Council.  Parents can utilize Parent Connect, an on-line program, to view their child’s attendance, discipline and grades.  Parents are invited to Back-To-School Night and Parent Conferences in the fall.  An Academy Night and Eighth Grade Orientation are available to new parents and students in the spring.  A parent volunteer is frequently assisting in the administration office.


II. Demographic Information

Student Enrollment -- Grade Level
Data reported are the number of students in each grade level as reported by the California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS).

 Grade Level

 Enrollment

 Grade Level

 Enrollment

 Kindergarten

 Grade 9

898 

 Grade 1

 Grade 10

910 

 Grade 2

 Grade 11

773 

 Grade 3

 Grade 12

619 

 Grade 4

 Ungraded Secondary

 Grade 5

 

 

 Grade 6

 Grade 7

 Grade 8

 Ungraded Elementary

 Total Enrollment

3200 


Student Enrollment -- Racial and Ethnic Subgroups
Data reported are the number and percent of students in each racial and ethnic subgroup as reported by CBEDS.

 Racial and Ethnic Subgroup

 Number
of
Students

 Percent
of
Students

 Racial and Ethnic Subgroup

 Number
of
Students

 Percent
of
Students

 African American

304 

9.5 

 Hispanic or Latino

1,031 

32.2 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

35 

1.1 

 Pacific Islander

44 

1.4 

 Asian

355 

11.1 

 White (Not Hispanic)

1,188 

37.1 

 Filipino

243 

7.6 

 Multiple or No Response

0.0 


III. School Safety and Climate for Learning

School Safety Plan
Information about the currency and contents of the school's comprehensive safety plan.

 Date of Last Review/Update 

  March 2004

 Date Last Discussed with Staff 

  Fall 2003

West High School is continually assessing school safety and climate.  Students, staff and parents are surveyed yearly.  This on-going process allows the school administration to identify, plan and implement strategies to prevent or lessen crime on our campus.  Having an on-going safe school plan allows West High School to continually adapt the safe school plan to best meet the changing needs of our students.  Through this process the school district and school site have come up with the following interventions:

 

  • Drug counseling programs
  • Security personnel at the high school (4 full-time/4 part-time at WHS)
  •  Three assistant principals at the high school
  • Six guidance counselors
  • Security personnel training program
  • Use of Nextel communications
  •  9-12 administrative security training program (Crisis Prevention Intervention)
  • Sexual harassment training for all staff members
  •  District Resource Officer program
  •  Student handbook and dress code
  • Multicultural week
  • Student Problem Identification and Resolving It Together (S.P.I.R.I.T.) program 
  • Truancy Officer


School Programs and Practices That Promote a Positive Learning Environment
Information about the school's efforts to create and maintain a positive learning environment, including the use of disciplinary strategies.

Our school implements special programs to emphasize the importance of school safety and promote attitudes of mutual respect and collaboration.  The principal honors eight students per month as Students of the Month.  A Block W is earned not only in athletics.  It can also be earned through academic achievement and through community service.  We utilize the Character Counts program in classrooms and have implemented the Victory with Honor program for our athletics teams.  We also have a SPIRIT program that has students from a variety of cultures and backgrounds working together to promote a positive learning environment and to solve problems on campus.  In the spring the school celebrates diversity with a Cultural Week and Fair.  An in-school suspension class is utilized as an option to off-campus suspensions and as a consequence for excessive tardiness.  Saturday School is utilized on a regular basis to compensate for truancy.  Self-contained special education classrooms and curriculum are provided for students with severe handicaps.  Success is a small, necessary high school, which provides an on-site alternative educational program for those who need an alternative to the comprehensive high school.  Students with special needs are enrolled in Independent Study and Home Hospital schooling programs.  Tutoring is available after school and before school in the core subject areas, modern language and Special Education.


Suspensions and Expulsions
Data reported are the number of suspensions and expulsions (i.e., the total number of incidents that resulted in a suspension or expulsion). The rate of suspensions and expulsions is the total number of incidents divided by the school's total enrollment as reported by CBEDS for the given year.

 

 School

 District

 2003

 2004

 2005

 2003

 2004

 2005

 Number of Suspensions

685

721

804 

3101

3168

3653

 Rate of Suspensions

.26

.27

.25 

.20

.19

.23

 Number of Expulsions

71

36

62 

166

181

197

 Rate of Expulsions

.03

.01

.02 

.01

.01

.01


IV. School Facilities

School Facility Conditions -- General Information
Information about the safety, cleanliness, and adequacy of school facilities, including the condition and cleanliness of the school grounds, buildings, and restrooms. Additional information about the condition of the school's facilities may be obtained by speaking with the school principal.

The district takes great efforts to ensure that all schools are clean, safe, and functional.  To assist in this effort, the district plans to use a facility survey instrument developed by the State of California Office of Public School Construction.  District maintenance staff ensures that the repairs necessary to keep the school in good repair and working order are completed in a timely manner.  A work order process is used to ensure efficient service and that emergency repairs are given the highest priority.

The district governing board has adopted cleaning standards for all schools in the district.  A summary of these standards is available at the school office, and at the district office.  The principal works daily with the custodial staff to develop cleaning schedules to ensure a clean and safe school.

The district participates in the State School Deferred Maintenance Program, which provides state matching funds on a dollar-for-dollar basis, to assist school districts with expenditures for major repair or replacement of existing school building components.  Typically, this includes roofing, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, electrical systems, interior or exterior painting, and floor systems.  For the 2004-05 school year, the district has budgeted $516,400 for the deferred maintenance program.  This represents .5% of the district's general fund budget.

The school has a staff of day and night custodians dedicated to the upkeep of our large campus.  Other district support staff members such as electricians, landscapers and plumbers are on campus as needed.  There are 114 classrooms, which include seven trailers and 17 rooms at the IGCG.   Additional facilities on the main campus include a student-run Student Store, a multi-purpose room and Career Center.  The athletic department utilizes a main gym, a sub gym, a weight room and dance/aerobics room.  In addition there are practice fields, two baseball diamonds, two softball diamonds and two soccer fields.  A small amount of acreage is devoted to an agriculture facility complete with storage and a greenhouse.  In addition, students enjoy outdoor handball courts, basketball courts and a student quad area, complete with food vending carts.  Various community and church groups, as well as San Joaquin Delta College, use the facilities weekly.  The IGCG is a self-contained, satellite facility with classrooms, science labs, a food-service facility, restrooms, a student lounge/study and administrative and staff offices.  Because the IGCG is not at full enrollment capacity, eight classrooms are used by teachers and students not affiliated with the Institute. The site still lacks tennis courts, a swimming pool, theater and a football/track stadium.


VI. School Completion (Secondary Schools)

California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE)
Beginning with the graduating class of 2006, students in California public schools will have to pass the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. The School Accountability Report Card for that year will report the percent of students completing grade 12 who successfully completed the CAHSEE.

These data are not required to be reported until 2006, when they can be reported for the entire potential graduating class. At that time, the data are expected to be disaggregated by special education status, English learners, socioeconomically disadvantaged status, gender, and ethnic group.


Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate
Data reported regarding progress toward reducing dropout rates over the most recent three-year period include grade 9 through 12 enrollment, the number of dropouts, and the one-year dropout rate as reported by CBEDS. The formula for the one-year dropout rate is (grades 9 through 12 dropouts divided by grades 9 through 12 enrollment) multiplied by 100. The graduation rate, included as one of the requirements of California's definition of Adequate Yearly Progress as required by the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, is calculated by dividing the number of high school graduates by the sum of dropouts for grades 9 through 12, in consecutive years, plus the number of graduates.

 

 School

 District

 State

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

   2002  

   2003  

   2004  

 Enrollment (9-12)

 2,471

 2,674

 2,798

 4,688

 4,957

 5,213

 1,772,417

 1,830,903

 1,876,927

 Number of Dropouts

 8

 8

 4

 27

 52

 12

 47,871

 58,189

 61,253

 Dropout Rate (1-year)

 0.3

 0.3

 0.1

 0.6

 1.0

 0.2

 2.7

 3.2

 3.3

 Graduation Rate

 98.5

 98.3

 99.0

 97.1

 94.5

 98.2

 87.0

 86.7

 85.1


VII. Class Size

Average Teaching Load and Teaching Load Distribution
Data reported are the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (i.e., number of students), by subject area, as reported by CBEDS.

 Subject

 2003

 2004

 2005

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of Classrooms

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 1-22

 23-32

 33+

 English

 26.2

 45

 25

 34

 29.4

 19

 38

 39

 31.1

 11

 32

 57

 Mathematics

 25.2

 41

 25

 20

 29.9

 7

 39

 31

 30.6

 11

 35

 38

 Science

 29.5

 5

 47

 17

 28.7

 5

 66

 

 29.9

 2

 64

 18

 Social Science

 27.9

 9

 37

 14

 30.6

 10

 18

 33

 29.5

 5

 43

 15


VIII. Teacher and Staff Information

Core Academic Courses Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers
For a school, the data reported are the percent of a school's classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) compliant teachers. For a district, the data reported are the percent of all classes in core academic subjects taught by NCLB compliant teachers in all schools in the district, in high-poverty schools in the district, and in low-poverty schools in the district. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/.

 

 Percent of Classes 
 In Core Academic Subjects 
 Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers 

 This School 

 4.5

 All Schools in District 

 23.3

 High-Poverty Schools in District 

 100.0

 Low-Poverty Schools in District 

 20.6


Teacher Credentials
Data reported are the number of teachers (full-time and part-time) as reported by CBEDS. Each teacher is counted as "1." If a teacher works at two schools, he/she is counted at one school only. Data for teachers with a full credential and teaching outside his/her subject area are provided by the LEA.

 

   2003  

   2004  

   2005  

 Total Teachers
 

 120

 120

 127

 Teachers with Full Credential
 

 101

 109

 117

 Teachers Teaching Outside Subject Area
 (full credential teaching outside subject area)

 

 

 

 Teachers in Alternative Routes to Certification
 (district and university internship)

 4

 8

 5

 Pre-Internship
 

 8

 2

 1

 Teachers with Emergency Permits
 (not qualified for a credential or internship but meeting minimum requirements)

 7

 1

 4

 Teachers with Waivers
 (does not have credential and does not qualify for an Emergency Permit)

 0

 0

 0


Teacher Misassignments
Data reported are the number of placements of a certificated employee in a teaching or services position, including positions that involve teaching English learners, for which the employee does not hold a legally recognized certificate or credential, or the placement of a certificated employee in a teaching or services position that the employee is not otherwise authorized by statute to hold. Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners. For the 2005-06 school year, the most currently available data are reported.

 

   2004  

   2005  

   2006  

 Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners
 

 0

 

 

 Total Teacher Misassignments
 

 0

 

 


Teacher Education Level
Data reported are the percent of teachers by education level, as reported by CBEDS.

 

   School  

   District  

 Doctorate

 1.6

 0.4

 Master's Degree plus 30 or more semester hours

 7.9

 4.2

 Master's Degree

 27.6

 17.3

 Bachelor's Degree plus 30 or more semester hours

 51.2

 64.2

 Bachelor's Degree

 11.8

 13.9

 Less than Bachelor's Degree

 0.0

 0.0


Vacant Teacher Positions
Data reported are the number of positions to which a single designated certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning of the year for an entire year or, if the position is for a one-semester course, a position to which a single designated certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning of a semester for an entire semester. For the 2005-06 school year, the most currently available data are reported.

 

   2004  

   2005  

   2006  

 Vacant Teacher Positions
 

 2

 

 


Teacher Evaluations
Information about the procedures and criteria for teacher evaluations.

The teacher evaluation process was negotiated by the teacher’s union and the district and the procedures are contained in the bargaining unit contract.  The procedures are then used district-wide.  Principals, assistant principals, and department directors are trained on the procedures by the Associate Superintendent for Human Resources and follow-up training is provided by the Director of Staff Development.  The procedures are visited on a regular basis to ensure that the process is consistently implemented throughout the district.

 

Teacher performance is evaluated and assessed as it relates to the six California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP) and one additional standard.  Those standards are:

 

1.       Engaging and supporting all students in learning

2.       Creating and maintaining effective environments for student learning

3.       Understanding and organizing subject matter for student learning

4.       Planning instruction and designing learning experiences for all students

5.       Assessing student learning

6.       Developing as a professional educator

7.       Professional conduct

 

Each standard contains specific elements along with rubrics for unsatisfactory practice, requires improvement, and satisfactory practice.  It is this criteria upon which teachers are evaluated.

 

Probationary and temporary teachers are evaluated every year.  Permanent teachers are evaluated at least every other school year.  If a permanent unit member receives a negative evaluation, the unit member will be evaluated annually until a satisfactory evaluation is achieved or he/she is separated from the District.


Substitute Teachers
Information about the availability of qualified substitute teachers and the impact of any difficulties in this area on the instructional program at the school.

The District maintains a list of credentialed substitute teachers. During the 2004-05 school year there were 386 substitute teachers on the District list.  This total includes 205 District teachers from schools on multi-track, year-round education calendars who substitute when they are off track and 181 regular substitute teachers.  The District recruits for substitute teachers through the newspaper advertising, universities, the District’s annual Teacher Recruitment Fair and the District website.  Continuity of classroom programs are maintained when substitutes are not available by using regular staff to cover instructional activities.  During the 2004-05 school year, West High had 68 absences for which a substitute teacher was not available.


Counselors and Other Support Staff
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100 percent (i.e., full time). Two staff persons who each work 50 percent of full time also equal one FTE.

 Title

   FTE  

 Counselor

 5.0

 Library Media Teacher (Librarian)

 

 Psychologist

 1.0

 Social Worker

 

 Nurse

 

 Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist

 

 Resource Specialist (non-teaching)

 

 Other

 1.6


Academic Counselors
Data reported are in units of full-time equivalents (FTE). One FTE is defined as a staff person who is working 100 percent (i.e., full time). Two staff persons who each work 50 percent of full time also equal one FTE. The ratio of students per academic counselor is defined as enrollment as reported by CBEDS divided by the full-time-equivalent academic counselors.

 Number of Academic
Counselors (FTE)

 Ratio of Students Per
Academic Counselor

 5.0

 640.0


IX. Curriculum and Instruction

School Instruction and Leadership
Information about the structure of the school's instructional program and the experience of the school leadership team.

A revised school improvement plan is generated every fall that reflects the evaluation of newly received assessment data and prescribes revised improvement strategies based on those data findings.  The data evaluated includes multiple assessments: district assessments, STAR, API and AYP results, proficiency in English/language arts, graduation/drop-out rates, completion of sequenced math courses, seniors completing A-G requirements, school safety and climate, expulsion and suspension rates, Distinguished School criteria, and attendance rates.  Teachers and departments receive specific feedback on their former and present students.  Using this information, the major departments formulate implementation strategies to improve academic achievement.

 

West’s yearly school plan has two significant goals that require a program of standards-based education.  The goals are: 1) to increase student achievement e.g.  API/STAR, CAHSEE, and district assessments; and 2) to support our sub-groups.  These goals require that California Content Standards be in place so assessments provide viable feedback to insure that curriculum and teaching strategies promote student achievement.  Math, English, social science and science are all closely aligned with those standards.  Other departments, such as Modern Language, have adopted the use of national standards or are aligned closely with the state frameworks.  End of course exams have been created and administered to evaluate the effective teaching of the course standards.  All departments have undertaken the task of creating, standards-based curriculum maps for all courses.  The high school departments, district wide, have been following the textbook adoption cycle and insure the textbooks correlate with California Content Standards.

 

The administration and faculty have undertaken a major effort to implement state academic and content standards.  West High has been mapping curriculum over the last five years.  In an effort to implement a standards-based education, as recommended in Aiming High, some early-release Mondays are dedicated to revising curriculum maps and assessments.  The English Language Learner (ELL) program meets standards for English Language Development (ELD) and all content areas.  To reinforce the science standards, a third year of science has been added as a graduation requirement.  The Special Education department provides remediation and a regular review of short-term student learning objectives, in order to move students into regular education classes.  The Space and Engineering Academy has high expectations for their graduates, who must fulfill a rigorous standards-based curriculum in order to receive their esteemed graduation certificate.

 

The school has a leadership team, which consists of all department chairpersons, the principal and lead counselor.  The team takes an active and highly collaborative role in ensuring the quality of instructional programs at West High school.  The team reviews and implements policies and procedures to ensure all students have access to quality curriculum and activities.

 

The School Site Council is responsible for the school plan and monitoring the distribution of categorical funds that support the school plan.


Professional Development
Information about the program for training the school's teachers and other professional staff.

For new teachers to the District, the Tracy Unified School District requires new teachers to participate in the Tracy Teacher Induction Program (TTIP).  This involves six full days of pre-service and 4 days of follow-up during the year.  At this time, teachers are introduced to the District and their site and receive training on classroom management, content organization, and lesson design.  All activities are based on the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP).  Throughout the year in TTIP, teachers are additionally supported in the classroom on a regular basis by a staff development specialist.  New teachers who qualify for the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) program will be assigned a BTSA Support Provider and will work through the events of the California Formative Assessment and Support System for Teachers (CFASST).

 

The District offers professional development opportunities for all staff members throughout the school year.  Two full days are provided before school starts and three buy-back days are offered through the year.

 

Every Monday, students are released early from school at 1:30 to allow teachers to participate in professional development opportunities.  These sessions are divided throughout the year to allow teachers to participate in site staff development, district staff development, and teacher collaboration time.


Quality and Currency of Textbooks and Instructional Materials
Information about the standards-aligned (kindergarten through grade 12) and state-adopted (kindergarten and grades 1 through 8) or locally adopted (grades 9 through 12) textbooks and other instructional materials used in the school that are consistent with the content and cycles of the curriculum frameworks adopted by the State Board of Education in the core curriculum areas of reading/language arts, mathematics, science, and history-social science. For kindergarten and grades 1 through 8, the information also includes a description of any supplemental curriculum adopted by the local governing board. The information includes an explanation for the use of any non-adopted textbooks or instructional materials.

To ensure that every student has sufficient, up-to-date textbooks and instructional materials, the Tracy Unified District is guided by the state textbook adoption schedule.  All district-adopted materials have been evaluated and recommended by curriculum committees consisting of teachers and administrators.  Parents and community members are invited to provide input on recommended textbooks prior to adoption.  District-adopted textbooks and instructional materials are aligned with state standards, and include K-8 textbooks approved by the State Board of Education, and high school textbooks approved by the Tracy Unified School District Governing Board.  A complete list of adopted textbooks is available in the District Instructional Media Center located at 1975 W. Lowell Ave. in Tracy.

 

In accordance with Education Code Section 60119 (a), the Governing Board of the Tracy Unified School District annually determines through public hearing and resolution that “for every subject studied, each pupil in each school in the district has sufficient textbooks, instructional materials, or both.”  All materials adopted, kindergarten through grade 12, meet state and local standards as evidenced through actions in open session of the Governing Board, and findings conducted by external auditors.  Generally, textbooks are provided in a ratio of one textbook per pupil.


Availability of Sufficient Textbooks and Instructional Materials
Information about the availability of sufficient standards-aligned (kindergarten through grade 12) and state-adopted (kindergarten and grades 1 through 8) or locally adopted (grades 9 through 12) textbooks and other instructional materials for each pupil, including English learners, that are consistent with the content and cycles of the curriculum frameworks adopted by the State Board of Education in the core curriculum areas of reading/language arts, mathematics, science, history-social science, foreign language, and health (kindergarten through grade 12); and science laboratory equipment (grades 9 through 12), as appropriate. For kindergarten and grades 1 through 8, the information also includes a description of any supplemental curriculum adopted by the local governing board.

 Core Curriculum Areas

 Availability of
Textbooks and Instructional Materials

 Reading/Language Arts

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in Reading/Language Arts. 

 Mathematics

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in Mathematics. 

 Science

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in Science. 

 History-Social Science

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in History/Social Science.

 Foreign Language

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in Foreign Language.

 Health

Following a Public Hearing, the TUSD Board of Education has found that sufficient textbooks and instructional materials are available to each student in health.

 Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12)

 A survey has determined that sufficient laboratory equipment exists for completion of required course objectives.


Instructional Minutes
Data reported compare the number of instructional minutes offered at the school level to the state requirement for each grade.

 Grade
Level

 Instructional Minutes

 Offered

 State Requirement

 9

64,890

 64,800

 10

64,890

 64,800

 11

64,890

 64,800

 12

64,890

 64,800


Minimum Days in School Year
Information about the total number of days in the most recent school year that students attended school on a shortened day schedule and the reasons for the shortened day schedule.

 10 minimum days.  Four for the end of each quarter.  Six for final examinations.


X. Postsecondary Preparation (Secondary Schools)

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Courses
Data reported are the number of Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses and classes offered, and the enrollment in various classes. The data for fine and performing arts include AP Art and AP Music, and the data for social science include IB Humanities.

 Subject

 Number of
Courses Offered

 Number of
Classes Offered

 Enrollment

 Fine and Performing Arts

 1

 2

 35

 Computer Science

 

 

 

 English

 2

 5

 126

 Foreign Language

 1

 5

 165

 Mathematics

 2

 2

 45

 Science

 2

 2

 31

 Social Science

 2

 6

 171


Student Enrollment in Courses Required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) Admission
Data reported are the number and percent of student enrollment in courses required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) admission. The percent of student enrollment is calculated by dividing the total student enrollment in courses required for UC and/or CSU admission by the total student enrollment in all courses. Note: Each student is counted in each course in which the student is enrolled. As a result of these duplicated counts, the student enrollment in all courses will, and the student enrollment in courses required for UC and/or CSU admission may, exceed the actual student enrollment figure for the school.

 Student Enrollment
In All Courses

 Student Enrollment
In Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 Percent of Student Enrollment
In Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 17228

 8290

 48.1


Graduates Who Have Completed All Courses Required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) Admission
Data reported are the number and percent of graduates who have completed all courses required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) admission. The percent of graduates is calculated by dividing the total number of graduates who have completed all courses required for UC and/or CSU admission by the total number of graduates.

 Number of Graduates

 Number of Graduates
Who Have Completed All Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 Percent of Graduates
Who Have Completed All Courses Required
For UC and/or CSU Admission

 484

 192

 39.7


SAT Reasoning Test
Data reported are the average verbal and math scores for Grade 12 students at the school, district, and state level who voluntarily take the SAT Reasoning Test for college entrance. Data are also reported for total grade 12 enrollment and percent of grade 12 enrollment taking the test. Students may take the test more than once, but only the highest score is reported at the year of graduation. The test may or may not be available to students at a given school. Detailed information regarding SAT results may be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sp/ai/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 

 School

 District

 State

 2003

 2004

 2005

 2003

 2004

 2005

 2003

 2004

 2005

 Grade 12 Enrollment

 573

 562

 619

 1109

 1112

 1176

 385,356

 395,194

 409,576

 Percent of Grade 12
 Enrollment Taking Test

 38.6

 40.4

 38.3

 33.7

 32.6

 32.3

 36.7

 35.3

 35.9

 Average Verbal Score

 492

 479

 480

 496

 486

 491

 494

 496

 499

 Average Math Score

 508

 498

 492

 512

 501

 501

 518

 519

 521


College Admission Test Preparation Course Program
Information about the school's college admission test preparation course program.

West High School offers a SAT preparation class once in the fall and again in the spring.  This program is provided by Ivy West, and independent company.  Students pay $200.  The class consists of 10 sessions.  Two of these sessions provide a full-length practice SAT.  Strategies taught include analogies, sentence completions, critical reading, arithmetic, algebra and geometry.  Test taking hints are also covered.


Workforce Preparation Programs
Information about the school's career technical education programs and classes.

The business department offers several computer courses which teach basic keyboarding skills, Word, Excel, Power Point and Access.  We also provide a marketing program.  Students first take an introduction to Marketing class and in the 11th and 12th grade they can opt to take a two hour Marketing class that includes working in the school store.  Many skills in retailing are learned in this program.  Another work related program is our Computer Tech/Repair Class.  This is a two year program that helps student prepare to take both the A+ core exam and the A+ DOS/Windows exam and thus become A+ certified.  The second year focus is on networking hardware, theory and network management.  The class is designed to get the student ready for the Network+ exam.

 

Other programs that are integrated in the school curriculum include resume writing and filling out job applications.  All students must complete these.  We also participate in a Mock Interview program and many students actually go through an interview by volunteers from our community.


XI. Fiscal and Expenditure Data

Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2003-04)
Data reported are the district salaries for teachers, principals, and superintendents, compared to the state average salaries for districts of the same type and size, as defined by Education Code Section 41409. Data are also reported for teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of a district's budget. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/salaries0304.asp. Note: County offices of education are not required to report average salaries and expenditures. The CDE's School Fiscal Services Division does not calculate statewide average salary and expenditure information for county offices of education.

 Category

 District
Amount

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 Beginning Teacher Salary

 $37,883

 $36,416

 Mid-Range Teacher Salary

 $53,018

 $57,615

 Highest Teacher Salary

 $70,010

 $72,229

 Average Principal Salary (Elementary)

 $96,972

 $92,400

 Average Principal Salary (Middle)

 $96,192

 $96,144

 Average Principal Salary (High)

 $94,184

 $103,778

 Superintendent Salary

 $143,400

 $153,803

 Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries

 44.9

 42.5

 Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries

 5.1

 5.4


District Expenditures (Fiscal Year 2003-04)
Data reported are the total dollars expended in the district and the dollars expended per student at the district compared to the state average for all districts and for districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding expenditures may be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/. Note: County offices of education are not required to report average expenditures. The CDE's School Fiscal Services Division does not calculate statewide average expenditure information for county offices of education.

 District

 District

 State Average
For Districts
In Same Category

 State Average
All Districts

 Total Dollars
Expended

 Dollars Expended
Per Student (ADA)

 Dollars Expended
Per Student (ADA)

 Dollars Expended
Per Student (ADA)

 $89,663,716

 $5,878

 $6,987

 $6,919


Types of Services Funded
Information about the programs and supplemental services that are provided at the school through either categorical funds or other sources.

About 64 percent of the District’s income is spent on employee salaries and 22 percent is spent on employee benefits.  Books and supplies account for 6 percent of the District’s spending and 7 percent is dedicated to services and operating costs.  The remaining 1 percent is spent on other District outgo.